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Triumph TR6

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  • 01

    1800

    Roadster

     
    A vehicle designed to take on the Jaguar. Steel shortages meant most of the body was built from aluminium. Using a Standard 1.5 litre engine, the Triumph version featured a downdraught Solex carburettor instead of the Jaguar's side-draught SU.
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    02

    2000

    Roadster

     
    The 1800 Roadster, model number 18TR,[1] was designed in the closing days of World War II.[5] Triumph had been bought by the Standard Motor Company in 1944,[5] and the managing director of Standard, Sir John Black, wanted a sports car to take on Jaguar.
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  • 03

    TR2

    Triumph

     
    The Triumph TR2 is a sports car produced by the Standard Motor Company in the United Kingdom between 1953 and 1955. It was only available in roadster form.
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    04

    TR3

    Triumph

     
    The Triumph TR3 is a British sports car produced between 1955 and 1962 by the Standard-Triumph Motor Company of Coventry, England. The TR3 is an evolution of the company's earlier TR2 model.
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  • 05

    TR4

    Triumph

     
    The Triumph TR4 is a sports car produced by the Triumph Motor Company from 1961 to 1965. As the successor to the TR3A, the car was based on the chassis and drivetrain of the previous TR sports cars
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    06

    TR5

    Triumph

     
    The Triumph TR5 is a sports car built by the Triumph Motor Company in Coventry, England, between August 1967 and September 1968. Visually similar to the Michelotti-designed TR4 roadster it was derived from the TR5.
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  • 07

    TR250

    Triumph

     
    A vehicle designed to take on the Jaguar. Steel shortages meant most of the body was built from aluminium. Using a Standard 1.5 litre engine, the Triumph version featured a downdraught Solex carburettor instead of the Jaguar's side-draught SU.
    Read More...
    08

    TR6

    Triumph

     
    The Triumph TR6 (1968–76) is a sports car built by British Triumph Motor Company between 1969 and 1976. The TR6 was introduced in January 1969 and produced until July 1976.
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  • 09

    Spitfire

    Mark I-IV

     
    The Spitfire was conceived by Standard-Triumph to compete in the small sports car market against the Austin-Healey Sprite. The Sprite had used the drive train of the Austin A30/A35 in a lightweight. The Spitfire used mechanicals from the Herald saloon/sedan.
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    10

    Spitfire

    1500

     
    In 1973 in the United States and Canada, and 1975 in the rest of the world, the 1500 engine was used on the MK IV body to make the Spitfire 1500.
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  • 11

    TR7

    TRIUMPH

     
    The Triumph TR7 sports car was manufactured in the United Kingdom from September 1974 to October 1981, until May 1975, by the Rover-Triumph Division of the British Leyland Motor Corporation (BLMC) and, thereafter, by the Specialist Division.
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    12

    TR8

    TRIUMPH

     
    The Triumph TR8, eight-cylinder version of the "wedge-shaped" Triumph TR7 sports car was designed by Harris Mann and manufactured by British Leyland (BL), through its Jaguar/Rover/Triumph (JRT) division. Because of its outstanding performance, the TR8 was often dubbed the "English Corvette".
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  • 13

    GT6

    TRIUMPH

     
    The Triumph GT6 is a 6-cylinder sports coupé built by Standard-Triumph, based on their popular Triumph Spitfire convertible. Production ran from 1966 to 1973.
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    14

    STAG

    TRIUMPH

     
    The Triumph Stag is a 2+2 sports tourer which was sold between 1970 and 1978 by the Triumph Motor Company, styled by Italian designer Giovanni Michelotti. Envisioned as a luxury sports car, the Stag was designed to compete directly with the Mercedes-Benz SL class models.
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In 1973 in the United States and Canada, and 1975 in the rest of the world, the 1500 engine was used on the MK IV body to make the Spitfire 1500. Although in this final incarnation the engine was rather rough and more prone to failure than the earlier units, torque was greatly increased by increasing the cylinder stroke to 87.5 mm (3.44 in), which made it much more drivable in traffic.[1]

While the rest of the world saw 1500s with the compression ratio reduced to 8.0:1, the American market model was fitted with a single Zenith-Stromberg carburettor and a compression ratio reduced to 7.5:1 to allow it to run on lower octane unleaded fuel.[1] With the addition of a catalytic converter and exhaust gas recirculating system, the engine only delivered 53 bhp (40 kW) (DIN) with a slower 0–60 mph time of 16.3 seconds.[13] The notable exception to this was the 1976 model year, where the compression ratio was raised to 9.1:1. This improvement was short-lived, however, as the ratio was again reduced to 7.5:1 for the remaining years of production.

 
Rear view of a 1978 Spitfire 1500

In the UK the 9:1 compression ratio, less restrictive emissions control equipment, and the Type HS2 SU carburettors now being replaced with larger Type HS4 models,[1] led to the most powerful variant to date. The 1500 Spitfire now produced 71 hp (DIN) at 5,500 rpm, and produced 82 lb⋅ft (111 N⋅m) of torque at 3,000 rpm.[1] Top speed was now at the 100 mph (160 km/h) mark, and 0 to 60 mph (97 km/h) was reached in 13.2 seconds.[1] Fuel economy was reduced to 29mpg.[1]

Further improvements to the suspension followed with the 1500 included longer swing axles and a lowered spring mounting point for more negative camber and a wider rear track. The wider, lower stance gave an impressive skid pad result of 0.87g average.

 
The 1979 Triumph Spitfire at the Marconi Automotive Museum
 
The final Triumph Spitfire to roll off the assembly line is this yellow 1980 hardtop example, pictured here at the British Motor Museum

The American market Spitfire 1500 is identified by large plastic over-riders and wing mounted reflectors on the front and back wings/fenders. US specification models up to 1978 featured chrome bumpers, and on the 1979 and 1980 models these were replaced by black rubber bumpers with built-in over-riders, using chassis extensions to support the bumpers.

Detail improvements continued to be made throughout the 1500's production run, including reclining seats with "chequered brushed nylon centre panels" and head restraints, introduced for domestic market cars early in 1977 along with a new set of column stalk operated minor controls (as fitted already in the TR7) replacing the old dashboard mounted knobs and switches.[14] Also added for the model's final years were a wood dash, hazard flashers and an electric screen washer, in place of the previous manual pump operated ones.[14] Options such as the hard top, tonneau cover, map light and overdrive continued to be popular, but wire wheels ceased to be available.

The 1980 model was the last and the heaviest Spitfire, weighing 1,875 lb (850.5 kg).[1] Base prices for the 1980 model year were $7,365 in the US and £3,631 in the UK.[1]

Die-cast models[edit]

  • Dinky Toys produced a model of the Spitfire 4 in the 1960s
  • Lledo Vanguards produced models of both the Spitfire 4 and the Mark 3 in the 2000s
  • Vitesse produced a model of the Mark IV in the 2000s
  • Sun Star produced a 1:18 scale die-cast model of a 1970 MkIV Spitfire in the 2000s
  • Minichamps produced a 1:43 Spitfire 1500 in both Green and Mimosa Yellow
  • A 1:18 scale die-cast model of a MkIV Spitfire has also been produced under the label Chrono.

References[edit]

Notes

  1. Jump up to:a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa Robson (1982), p. 187.
  2. ^ http://www.motorgraphs.com/heritage/malines-belgium-factory-leyland-triumph-1972_a156434.aspx Malines (Belgium) factory Leyland-Triumph 1972, (c) British Motor Industry Heritage Trust
  3. ^ SPITTY TIPS – 19. Australian Spitfire Colours Retrieved on 30 March 2012
  4. Jump up to:a b c "Used car test: 1970 Triumph Spitfire Mk.3". Autocar138 (4022): 26–27. 28 June 1973.
  5. ^ "Spitfire Production Dates". triumphspitire1500.co.uk.
  6. ^ Lentinello, Richard (August 2012). "Triumph's Triumph"Hemmings Motor News.
  7. ^ Triumph advertisement circa 1974: http://www.triumphspitfire.nl/salesliterature/IMG_0051.jpg
  8. Jump up to:a b Blunsden, John (October 1962). "Triumph Spitfire 4". Illustrerad Motor Sport (in Swedish). No. 10. Lerum, Sweden. p. 16.
  9. ^ Blunsden, p. 17
  10. Jump up to:a b "News and views: 100,000 Triumph Spitfires". Autocar128 (3757): 58. 15 February 1968.
  11. ^ Standard-Triumph Sales Ltd (1970). Standard-Triumph Spitfire Mk3 Spare Parts Catalogue. Standard-Triumph Sale Ltd, Spares Division, Coventry, England.
  12. Jump up to:a b Thomason, John (2006). Triumph Spitfire and GT6: a guide to originality. Ramsbury: Crowood. ISBN 9781861268617OCLC 67375471.
  13. ^ "Triumph Spitfire: Still attractive after all these years". Sports & GT Cars. 1980.
  14. Jump up to:a b "Motorweek:New Models ... Spitfire". Motor: 2. 5 March 1977.

Bibliography

  • Robson, Graham (1982). Triumph Spitfire and GT6. Osprey Publishing. ISBN 0-85045-452-2.

Further reading[edit]

  • Peter G. Strasman and J.H. Haynes. (1987). Triumph Spitfire owner's workshop manual. Haynes. ISBN 1-85010-022-5.
  • Porter, Lindsay; Williams, Peter (1988). Triumph Spitfire, GT6, Herald Vitesse: Guide to Purchase and D.I.Y. Restoration. G T Foulis. ISBN 0-85429-583-6.
  • British Leyland (1992). Competition Preparation Manual (reprint ed.). Brooklands Books. ISBN 1-870642-60-0.

Advance Auto Wire

Color Codes
N Brown LG Light Green G Green
U Blue W White B Black
R Red Y Yellow K Pink
P Purple S Slate O Orange
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TR250 - TR6 Wiring

Laminated poster diagrams available in 11x17 or 18x24. Select your vehicle
TRIUMPH WIRING POSTER

Triumph Quarter Mile

Comprehensive index of Triumph car 0 to 60 car specs

0 to 60 mph

Triumph TR4, Spitfire, GT6, TR7, Herald, Renown, Vitesse and many more!
Triumph Quarter Mile

6-PACK

 

What do we do?

Good question…

6-Pack is a single marque club dedicated to ownership of the Triumph TR6 and TR250 vehicles manufactured from 1968 to 1976.

We offer free forums for technical advice and a paid club with a periodical and the ability to attend the club get together – the Trials – the largest single event gathering of TR6 and TR250s in the US.

ROUTE 66 WRAPS AND SIGNS

Owner Steve Howie is a good friend. He is very experienced and I highly recommend him. He offers a variety of services from car wraps to plasma cutting. Location:
3332 South Sante Fe Ave, Tulsa, OK
Phone: (918) 347-1386.

S5 Accordion Menu

EVENTS

Monthly Meeting - exact DATE/VENUE TBD

December
Tuesday
20
Join us for our clubs Monthly Meeting - Stay tuned for details

BUYERS GUIDE


The Triumph TR6 has been a cornerstone of the sports car world. However, more than 40 years old, it might have an issue or two.

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PARTS


Here are a few recommended places to buy Triumph parts:

Moss Motors
The Roadster Factory
Good Parts
Rimmer Bros

Classifieds


Much time invested on this TR4 Dash.
Reasonable price for this trailer
Set of TR6 beauty rims for sale

Classifieds

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